breath
transaction
game
script
breath
––from the forthcoming
Oblio's Cap


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The Forthcoming Oblio's Cap

Email me: beau (at) oblios-cap (dot) com.

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Of a time I wrote:

Think of oblios-cap as experimental writing, with a little bit of the semantic overload effect one experiences when repeating a single word over and over too many times so that it begins to lose it's wordness.

Below, a relevant quote from Douglas Hofstadter's "Le Ton Beau de Marot: In Praise of the Music of Language":

I [Hofstadter] shall devote the remainder of this chapter to describing the highly unstable, dynamic, intuitive art of translation...or at least my own personal experience of it. In doing this, I rely on drafts that I have kept, sometimes up to twenty highly marked-up drafts of a given poem. And yet, despite this wealth of recorded detail, in any particular act of translation, whether of a whole poem, a stanza, a line, or just a single word, there is an unfathomably wide gulf between what I can jot down on paper and what actually goes on hidden in my mind (of which 99 percent, just to pin a number on it, is subconscious and hence inaccessible to my introspection).

Oblio's Cap is, then, amongst other things, the result of introspectively accessing my subconscious, whatever number one chooses to pin on it.

That was, of course then, there, them. This is here, now, us.




Mon Feb 16 07:25:00 EST 2009

Ken

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Ken is the name of the trigram of the youngest son, it is also the trigram for mountain, and incorporates stillness and boundary. The trigram is binary 4, and this hexagram is binary 36. Note again how the increment of one unit has caused a flip of three lines; such is the nature of Change in the book of Changes.

A doubled trigram, of course, represents a condition in which the inner and outer aspects are aligned. The inner face of this hexagram is stillness and boundaries, as is the outer. This congruence between inner and outer aspects is a feature in itself, occuring 8 out of 64 times, once for each of the trigrams.

That said, the hexagram Ken signifies stillness and boundaries, just like the trigram. The text speaks in particular of bringing stillness to the back, and it is hard to imagine the rest of the body flouncing about whilst the back is thus stilled. To my eye, there is another relationship, that of the spine in the body to a ridge of mountains on land, like refering to the Rockies as the spine of the continent. Living as I have for the past few years nestled up to the San Gabriel foothills, I have come to appreciate this hexagram more than I ever could have growing up in Long Beach. But while the shore of the ocean or a lake or even the path of a river can be used as a logical boundary, mountains are different. If they are less binding today, thanks to rail travel and air travel, mountains are still barriers with which to reckon.

Perhaps one of the least understood aspects of what folks call "setting boundaries" is that announcing one is going to set boundaries largely defeats the purpose. When one draws a line in the sand, it is usually seen as a challenge (and, indeed, it is most often done as a challenge). But when one actually sets a boundary, rather than merely announcing it, one seeks to emulate the mountains, still, calm, impassive and unpassable, discouraging challenge rather than inviting it.

Ken, then, is the hexagram for stillness and boundary, within and without. Soon it will change.


Email me: beau (at) oblios-cap (dot) com.

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